Storytellers

April 29th, 2011  |  Published in Explore

Summer 2011:

Kate Burke is beginning her third year at the University of Oregon as a journalism major with a minor in Spanish and anthropology. She is moved by the fascinating imagery that nature has provided for us, and thus, will focus on documentary production and photojournalism. Journalism came into her life when she realized the need for a gateway to the exploration of all of her passions and curiosities such as traveling, wildlife, nature, and diverse human cultures. Through storytelling, she hopes to plant a seed in the minds of individuals that will inspire the development of care and concern for the conservation of wildlife and the natural world.

Branden FitzPatrick will be starting his junior year at the University of Oregon in September. He is currently working toward a degree in journalism and advertising. He has extensive writing experience, including the development of an expansive essay for last years Trash Edition of the NOMAD. He specializes in multimedia and design. Branden grew up in Elk Grove, California before moving to Salem, Oregon in 2003. As a child living in Northern California, he became an avid Sacramento Kings fan. Many of his childhood memories were formed watching basketball games at Arco Arena. In his spare time, Branden enjoys bike riding, running and visiting his family back home.

Lauren Jow is a designer and illustrator who appreciates the outlet journalism provides for smart design, which she defines as effective, useful and visually pleasing. She also values journalism for its combination of technology and creativity to convey practical information and its commitment to connecting people.

Lauren currently works on visual content for the International Educational Computing Conference (ISTE) and other national conferences. She has worked as a designer for the Oregon Daily Emerald and Flux Magazine and previously explored the nonprofit industry, serving as a field director and on the board of directors for MAPLE Microdevelopment, an organization dedicated to sustainable community building and education. She loves learning and will always consider herself a student.

Anthony Rimel graduates from the University of Oregon with a post-baccalareuate degree in journalism this summer and wants to pursue a career as a multimedia journalist who combines audio, video and stills to tell compelling stories.  In addition to his studies at UO, Rimel has a bachelor’s degree in business from OSU.  While at UO, Rimel has produced segments for the student run variety show DuckU, published text stories in the Oregon Daily Emerald, and taken photos for Ethos and Flux magazines.  Additionally, in the summer of 2010 Rimel co-produced a video that won a $1000 prize in a public service announcement competition run by an Oregon utility company.

Rimel has a life long interest in science and nature and hopes to produce high quality content that allows everyday people to understand complex scientific issues.  For more information about Rimel, visit anthonyrimel.wordpress.com or contact him at anthonyrimel@gmail.com.

 

Winter 2011:

Heather Ah San is a senior journalism major who will graduate in spring 2011. She has experience primarily in writing in reporting for campus publications, though she also has some multimedia experience with Final Cut Pro and Photoshop from some of my previous J classes. Heather is interning at My Eugene this term and hopes to try her hand at some multimedia projects there as well. If she weren’t journalism major (and if she liked chemistry better) she may have ended up studying biology or nutrition. She also really loves social science.

Lorie Anne Acio is a Robert D. Clark Honors College senior majoring in broadcast journalism at the University of Oregon. She was born in the Philippines but grew up in Honolulu, Hawaii. She loves to unearth untold stories and express herself artistically through documentary filmmaking. Lorie Anne plans on becoming a broadcast news reporter with a focus on international and global humanitarian reporting. She is committed to increasing diversity, and she hopes to use the various functions of mass media to raise awareness about important issues as well as highlight the lives of ordinary citizens with remarkable stories.

Andrew Creasey is a senior journalism student focusing on magazine writing. He is a feature writer for Ethos magazine and a contributor to Oregon Music News. He is infected with a travel bug that has no cure in sight. He hopes to cultivate the ability to fashion long-form, quasi-informative prose into a lucrative career. Follow him on Twitter for irregular updates on articles written and fascinating nonsense encountered.

 

Steven Foreman grew up in Flagstaff, Arizona spending much of his time mountain biking and skiing. He moved to Fairbanks, Alaska in 2005. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in English from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 2009. He now studies journalism at the University of Oregon, and plans to graduate with a Master’s in June. He wants to make documentaries on foreign conflicts.

 

Rachelle Hacmac is a senior journalism major at the University of Oregon. She is a multimedia journalist passionate about storytelling. In addition to classes, she works as a staff photographer for the Oregon Daily Emerald and interns as a photographer/videographer for King Estate winery in Eugene. Rachelle also works freelance for Willamette Week and does photography and design for Wallin and Buerkle (jewelry) in Portland

 

Andrew Hard is a senior at the University of Oregon, currently majoring in magazine journalism and minoring in political science. He has many passions, including music composition, martial arts, and the outdoors, but ever since he began writing science fiction stories at the age of 13, he knew that the art of writing was his true calling.  Andrew has always been enthusiastic about capturing the essence of a subject and putting it to page, and he relishes the opportunity to research complex subjects and recount tangible, consolidating themes for readers.  Although Andrew has spent the last year writing about the arts for the Portland online magazine Oregon Music News, the process of crafting and polishing a story is more important than the individual topic.  After graduation, Andrew hopes to write political, arts, or human-interest features for one of the Northwest’s top magazines and continue his ongoing education to become the best writer he can.

Edwin Ouellette is a soon to be graduate of the University of Oregon, with a double bachelor’s degree in Magazine Journalism and Political Science. His journalism interests include long-form feature writing, investigatory journalism, profile pieces, humorous essays, graphic design, and political cartooning. When not writing, editing, designing or illustrating, he can be found playing badminton, reading political biographies, and boxing.

 

Ashley Pennington is a senior at the University of Oregon majoring in news/editorial and magazine journalism as well as philosophy. She will graduate in July and is hoping to attend graduate school in the fall. Ashley is originally from Tigard, Oregon.

 

 

Leilani Rapaport is a journalism student at the University of Oregon. She was raised in Honolulu, Hawaii and spent a year abroad in Madrid, Spain. Leilani has interned at Trade Publishing Company and KMTR NewsSource 16, and now works as a multimedia producer for the Oregon Daily Emerald. She hopes to pursue career interests in documentary production and media law.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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The Science Stories initiative sends teams of student reporters out in the field to create collaborative, multiplatform stories about cutting edge research coming out of the Pacific Northwest Research Station.

In winter 2011, our “Trees and the City” team traveled into the heart of the concrete jungle in downtown Portland to interview scientists, community members, and tree advocates about the benefits of a healthy, urban  canopy.

Watch the team video

 

 

 

 

 

Our “Digital Landscapes” team worked with mapping and modeling scientists to break down the real world benefits of computer projections for sensitive landscapes.

Watch the team video